The newly revised Manual of Christian Reformed Church Government by Rev. Peter Borgdorff is now available for order through Faith Alive Christian Resources in hard copy or online through the new online Digital Library.

Click here for more information on how to order a hard copy of the book or how to access the Digital Library if you do not have an account.

This new edition replaces the 2008 manual and includes all Church Order changes through Synod 2015.

“This edition of the Manual of Christian Reformed Church Government incorporates decisions made by the synods of the Christian Reformed Church in North America through Synod 2015,” writes Borgdorff in the Preface.

“It is our hope and prayer that this manual will prove to be a helpful resource for the church as a whole, as well as for denominational functionaries who are called upon to give guidance and direction when the church gathers in its various assemblies.”

The pages of commentary within this manual, says Borgdorff, provide insights and explanation regarding decisions of past synods that may not necessarily be found within the wording of the Church Order and its Supplements.

The manual addresses such topics as the qualifications for and role and function of various officebearers in the church and the role and function of church councils, classes, and synod.

In addition, the manual discusses the significance the Reformed confessions play in the church; issues involved in worship; and the CRC’s involvement in ecumenical matters.

In discussing how the manual was compiled, Borgdorff writes, “The task of compilation demands that judgments be made about what to include and what to exclude. The criteria employed were the welfare of the church today and guidance for the church in the future.

“When reviewing the multitude of regulations, decisions, and advice that synods have adopted through the years, it becomes clear that some synodical decisions are too dated to be included. The purpose of this manual is to provide information that is pertinent as the church ministers in a contemporary context.”